JOSHUA FIT THE BATTLE OF JERICHO

 

JOSHUA FIT THE BATTLE OF JERICHO

Tissot
J. James Tissot (1904)

 

 

Joshua fit the battle of Jericho

Jericho, Jericho

Joshua fit the battle of Jericho

The walls come tumblin’ down, Hallelujah

 

Joshua fit the battle of Jericho

Jericho, Jericho

Joshua fit the battle of Jericho

And the walls come tumblin’ down

 

You may talk about the men of Gideon

You may talk about the men of Saul

But there’re none like good old Joshua

At the battle of Jericho

 

Joshua fit the battle of Jericho

Jericho, Jericho

Joshua fit the battle of Jericho

And the walls come tumblin’ down, Hallelujah

 

Joshua fit the battle of Jericho

Jericho, Jericho

Joshua fit the battle of Jericho

And the walls come tumblin’ down

 

Up to the walls of Jericho

With sword drawn in his hand

“Go blow them horns”, cried Joshua

“The battle is in my hands”

 

Joshua fit the battle of Jericho

Jericho, Jericho

Joshua fit the battle of Jericho

And the walls come tumblin’ down, that mornin’

 

Joshua fit the battle of Jericho

Jericho, Jericho

Joshua fit the battle of Jericho

And the walls come tumblin’ down, Hallelujah

 

Joshua fit the battle of Jericho

Jericho, Jericho

Joshua fit the battle of Jericho

And the walls come tumblin’ down

 

 

“Joshua Fit the Battle of Jericho” is an African-American spiritual,  composed in the first half of the 19th century, sung by pre-Civil War slaves.

Some parts were written in dialect: ‘fit’, for example, is a way of saying ‘fought’.

The lyrics allude to the biblical story of the Battle of Jericho, when Joshua captured the city after ordering the Israelites to blow trumpets until the walls fell down
However, as with many Negro spirituals, the biblical imagery can also be read as a hidden allusion to escape from slavery: either a signal for an escape attempt or simply the expression of their hope for freedom.

It is believed that a number of  Spirituals, such as “Wade in the Water”,  contained explicit instructions to fugitive slaves on how to avoid capture and on the route to take, for example crossing a river  to make sure that the dogs employed by slavers lost their trail

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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